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Comments

  • selthera

    selthera

    March 10, 2015, 12:08 pm

    Amazing, and yet very disheartening.

    I don't find it surprising that the Courts have so much power, given the history of power distribution in the US. It happens far too often that privilege and power take priority over the needs of the "common" man and justice only is served when it benefits the former in some way.

    Combine this with the various issues with law enforcement, privacy rights, human rights, etc and you have a recipe for disaster in this country.

    Sadly, the average Joe really doesn't care about these things unless it makes them have to turn off the TV or pay more for some everday item...

    Reply

  • 45t3r15k

    45t3r15k

    March 11, 2015, 3:44 am

    I work currently as a developer and dba. I do not think it all that unusual for IT professionals to have hobbies in in more concrete realms at all. It occurs to me that IT workers in particular may have the desire to do more mechanical things in thier off time after working in the realm of the virtual all day. I have been fitting my garage with loads of woodworking equipment over the past few years, especially 1940s power tools. I have a lathe, scrollsaw, compressor, radial arm saw and table saw from that era as well as a more recent drill press and band saw. I am building a Roubo style workbench from 4x4 oak timbers lately. Once I have completed it, I will be using it to make lots of furniture for my own home, hopefully.

    Reply

  • YumYumKittyloaf

    YumYumKittyloaf

    March 10, 2015, 6:33 am

    Yes, you are probably not directly responsible for the bailout. That was unavoidable because of the fact that the execs didn't disclose information and our representatives have not made it a direct policy of theirs to check up on such things of that nature. Hopefully that has changed now. It's true that the lowest common denominator is not at fault directly, but the majority of them voted a representative into power that was either incompetent on things of that nature or is easily corrupt (aka greedy).

    Greed is a motivator for a lot of this, saying it isn't is naive.

    Reply

  • Kazter

    Kazter

    March 11, 2015, 4:39 am

    One of the best pieces of advice offered here and many other places over and over again is this...

    Communication. Ask her to dinner, communicate directly that you are interested in her and the outing being that of a "date". If you don't do dinner, and have another "hang-out" session. Make sure you open up as honestly as possible and tell her you are interested in dating her. I wouldn't suggest making a move on her, without talking to her first about your feelings. That can only lead to a *more* awkward situation.

    The worst that can happen is she turns you down, but at least you had the dignity to ask and she will respect you for it.

    Reply

  • MikeSeth

    MikeSeth

    March 10, 2015, 11:39 am

    > And white phosphorus was designed to set fire to objects.

    And fire is designed to burn things. And things are designed to be stuff. What's your point? It is not illegal and it is not prohibited. Are you arguing that smoke grenades are too cruel a weapon?

    > Again, common sense and just the tiniest amount of compassion for your fellow human beings is all that is required to understand that you don't use white phosphorus where there is a high risk of fatality or injury as a result.

    You do use white phosphorous where there's a high risk of anti-tank missiles, snipers and machine gun fire. Which is exactly how and where IDF used it.

    > Or to put it another way, were the Palestinians to use this weapons against Jews you and the rest of the brotherhood of the retarded monkey would be besieging us all with ten times the number of sock puppet accounts as is usual.

    Is there ever a single day in your life that doesn't begin with suspicion that the people around you are clones of someone else and they're all watching you? It's a known condition. And if ever in some deluded universe there was a fight between a real (e.g. equipped with customary weapons and not maim boobytraps and suicide belts, wearing uniform, attacking military targets and otherwise legitimate) palestinian army and IDF, I would absolutely expect them to use these *smoke grenades* because they are used like that often.

    > BTW, the U.S. Military (yeah, the guys who give you all the cool shit that lets you lay waste to Gaza and Lebanon) refers to wp as a chemical weapon.

    That's because they use it as a weapon.

    > You have no case that can stand up to impartial scrutiny. This is why the world is turning its back on Israel.

    The world is doing no such thing. People aren't dumb and can read books and google shit.

    > It's because you're wrong.

    That's an awfully terse way to denounce the misinterpretation of my beliefs.

    Reply

  • maxwellmaxwell

    maxwellmaxwell

    March 10, 2015, 8:12 am

    Tickets to see Kanye and Lady Gaga, with a zillion backup dancers and a laser light show, playing on a huge sound system, would definitely be worth a hundred dollars to me. Tickets to Nirvana in 1993 were about $20 (I found one for $19.25). That's about $30 in today's money. Assuming Kanye gets half the money, the Kanye half of my ticket costs $50 - twenty bucks more than Nirvana, but if Nirvana were playing today they'd probably have a giant light show too, so tickets would be about the same. Tickets to Hendrix in 1970 were four bucks, which is an awesome fucking bargain even adjusted for inflation.

    People have a weird kind of myopia when it comes to music, though. Keep in mind that the highest any Hendrix single charted in the US was #20 ("All Along The Watchtower"). Most of the adoration came after his death. It'll be interesting to see how people feel about Kanye when he's dead.

    **TL;DR: LASER LIGHT SHOW**

    Reply

  • ElectricRebel

    ElectricRebel

    March 10, 2015, 9:04 pm

    Yes, government did it. Of course! That would explain why during the Glass-Steagall era how we had exactly zero financial panics. How was I so blind?

    Riddle me this: how did the CRA and other regs force Merrill Lynch, Lehman Brothers, and AIG to play with Collateralized Debt Obligations and Credit Default Swaps to the point that they were leveraged 30-1 or more? Also, why was it the subprime loans that were not covered by the CRA were the vast majority of the foreclosures?

    Thinking that the government did this is actually an accurate statement. Only you are backwards. It was deregulation. This is rooted from when Clinton signed Gramm-Leach-Bliley, when the Bush tax cuts giving the rich more money than they need so they could start gambling with it, when the Clinton and Bush SECs refused to monitor derivatives and mortgage fraud (by the companies, not consumers), when Greenspan said we should all get home equity loans, when the Supreme Court struck down laws that regulated credit cards, when every administration since Reagan has put ex-bankers in key regulator positions, and when the government convinced people that the New Deal regulations were harming, rather than protecting them.

    It is amazing that after all that has happened, people still think it is because of regulations. WHERE THE HELL HAVE YOU BEEN DURING THE PAST 28 YEARS OF DEREGULATION AS THE NATIONAL RELIGION?

    Reply

  • korjagun

    korjagun

    March 10, 2015, 9:14 pm

    Yep. At least in that case, there is no ambiguity to the compiler. However, if Foo is a class, then you might be tempted to think that this:

    Foo bar();

    ... is a declaration of a Foo instance called bar. Nope, no such luck; that's a function declaration, declaring a function called bar that returns a Foo object. The compiler will happily swallow it up without a warning. This *is* a variable declaration though (assuming an appropriate constructor exists):

    Foo bar(42);

    I don't know how many times I've made this error now. The correct syntax is of course just "Foo bar;"... but on the other hand, it's "new Foo()" and "new Foo(42)", making the syntax feel inconsistent as hell.

    Reply

  • CadenR

    CadenR

    March 10, 2015, 4:29 pm

    I think you did the right thing asking here at Reddit like you did.

    BOA is in the business to make money and not get screwed out of money, so they will initiate policies that let such bills get passed on without admitting guilt or fault and have it be perfectly legal, sound familiar?

    Small claims court; you’d have to prove BOA didn’t check its bills thoroughly enough to win but the cost of the BOA attorney will be much higher than $100 and as such the bank may not represent themselves giving you the win.

    Go to your local TV station. They have a great track record of getting companies to fold for good PR.

    If you’re really hot under the collar you may want to contact the FBI, they’ll trace it back to its creation and may actually be able to say that BOA may have had it. At least FBI agents showing up at the BOA branch asking questions will make them think twice about letting such bills go out the door even if they can make it legal to do so.

    Good luck!

    Reply

  • JoshSN

    JoshSN

    March 10, 2015, 12:07 pm

    I'm not trolling. I used to work at the UN, back in 1999, on their payroll system. While I was there I looked up all the votes on issues related to Israel. I know that sounds odd, especially since I wasn't even really interested in politics back then, but I did. Keyword searches were pretty easy. Anyway, throughout the history of the UN the votes have gone this way. I seem to recall a lot of 151-2 votes back before the Marshall Islands and Micronesia got a vote, and a bunch of 2??-4 votes since then. This is the first time I've seen Australia and its two fake countries vote on this side of this issue, and I can only imagine it has something to do with the new PM, Kevin Rudd.

    Reply

  • pa23

    pa23

    March 10, 2015, 11:14 pm

    Takuo Toda's signature paper airplane is no ordinary bit of origami. After launch on April 11, the snub-nosed craft wafted so high into the rafters of the vast Fukuyama Big Rose Hall in Hiroshima, Japan, that the camera operator recording the flight lost sight of it for a couple of seconds. The clock kept ticking. Finally, 27.9 seconds after it left Toda's hand, the fittingly named Sky King drifted to the ground, ending a flight 0.3 seconds longer than the previous world record for a paper plane. Toda, 53, is president of a company called Castem that builds metal parts to order. But he has also dedicated his life to building innovative paper aircraft. "Since I was about 4 years old, I've been able to make really good paper planes and commit the steps to memory," Toda says. He has developed 700 designs, written a dozen books on the subject, and created a museum of paper gliders.

    Toda continues to try to top his record: He says he achieved a 35-second flight in a recent practice run. Eventually, he plans to go transatmospheric. "My dream is to have one of my planes thrown to Earth from outer space," he says. The Japanese space agency, JAXA, is actually testing the idea, using special heat-resistant paper, another of Toda's plane designs, and a Mach 7 wind tunnel. This could have many practical applications, such as, er ... we'll get back to you on that.

    Reply

  • thischarmingham

    thischarmingham

    March 11, 2015, 2:45 am

    My experience, yes it does. A lot of people will come in without realizing just how dehydrated they are in a given day: "Oh, I only had some coffee this morning, maybe a sip of juice earlier." when it's 3 in the afternoon. Dehydration definitely shows on your vascular system, and you'll see a noticeable difference when hydrated vs. dehydrated with how plump your veins appear and feel. A great majority of finding a suitable vein isn't so much appearance but its feel, and the more bounce and plumpness, the better for blood draw.

    Reply

  • mcantelon

    mcantelon

    March 10, 2015, 6:29 pm

    >A CMS requiring a slew of third-party mods before it can be usable is useless to someone who can code a custom Rails CMS in a day or two.

    In other words, a system one doesn't know is useless to someone who knows an other system with a similar purpose. Right. Use the system you know.

    While I agree with some of this critique, here are some points I take issue with.

    >Databases are great for storing passwords, content, and countless other things. These things do not include “views”, i.e. templates. That’s right, templates. In the database. Drupal stores templates in the database.

    Views are not templates. Views are more analogous to database queries. Drupal does, in fact, store templates in the filesystem.

    >Drupal has a history of security vulnerabilities and is written in ugly spaghetti code

    Ironically, the OP's blog post is hosted in WordPress, a PHP project that, unlike Drupal, really *does* have security issues.

    Drupal's security response is great. When's the last time an update-to-date Drupal site was hacked? The code isn't object oriented, but is clean and a coding standing is upheld.

    >Gripe #4: Drupal’s None Too Friendly

    Drupal's community is one of the friendliest, non-elitist out there. Really. The Drupal project has a higher percentage of women involved than any other open source project of a comparable size.

    >There’s been quite a backlash over Drupal’s new trademark policy, which is rather contrary to the spirit of open-source software.

    The backlash has been by folks who don't realize that protecting trademark is standard practice for large open source projects. Look at the license of MySQL, for example.

    >Drupal's search sucks

    What CMS, out of the box, has a search that doesn't suck? Use Solr or Sphinx.

    Reply

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